Un Silence Assourdissant

People become uncomfortable when faced with a long, painful silence with someone else.

I’m one of those people.

I felt uncomfortable when I tried to engage in a conversation with a stranger, but that stranger wasn’t really interested in me, nor the “nice” weather that I was talking about as I fan myself with a handkerchief because it was almost 40 degrees outside.

I felt uncomfortable during prom night when my friends dared me to slow dance with someone whom I used to like. Thinking it would be a harmless dance because I didn’t like him anymore, I accepted the dare. In the end, we were both standing on the dance floor in silence until the song ended because he misunderstood the whole situation and feared that other people would think that he liked me.

I felt uncomfortable when I decided to arrive at a group meeting earlier than what was discussed because I was left alone with another groupmate, whose personality clashed with mine. We both had to mask the cold atmosphere that surrounded us, so we struck a conversation with each other, only to end it in less than 30 seconds, with an insincere smile and a heavy sigh, because our other groupmates weren’t arriving fast enough.

People become uncomfortable when faced with a long, painful silence with someone else.

I was one of those people, but I got used to it.

I got so used to it that when we had our last conversation over the phone and I asked you—in an almost inaudible tone—if you still love me, I wasn’t so surprised anymore.


 

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